Creating A Brief For Your WordPress Developer: 8 Things To Remember

Creating a brief for your WordPress developer Featured Image

Writing a brief for your WordPress developer is something you must never overlook or discard as unnecessary. If you want to get a high-quality end product, you must be ready to put in some effort to phrase what you want this product to be. Here are the things to keep in mind when creating a brief for your WordPress developer.

Why Is It Important?

A brief for your WordPress developer is important for four main reasons:

  • It provides key details about what you want the developer to do and what you want the result to be.
  • It sets the tone of your project and gives a general idea of what it is that you have in mind.
  • It sets the timeframes and deadlines for the project describing when and what should be completed.
  • It specifies the requirements and additional features you might decide to add later on.

If your brief achieves all of these, then your WordPress developer will definitely know what you want from them and what they must do to get the results you need. Now, let’s get into the step-by-step guide.

1. General Project Information

The first section of your brief contains general project information. It functions as a kind of introduction to your document that aims to provide some of the key data about the client and the project.

First, include your personal details such as your full name, contact information, the company or organization you are representing, and so on. Anything that you consider necessary can be added. If you are not the client, then include the details of the person who you are working for and who will be the client.

Second, include the basic details about the project such as the project’s name, timeframes, and so on. Don’t go into much detail about any particular piece of information in this section as these will be discussed later on in your brief.

2. Goals & Estimates

The next section of your brief must contain the goals and estimates for your project. Think of what you want to achieve with this particular endeavor and then also include what your personal goals are if you are in charge of it.

Photo by Isaac Smith on Unsplash

In addition to that, talk about the problems that the project will solve. These can be both big and small, but make sure to include at least one problem. Also, include estimates for your project and what you think it will achieve that is not connected to solving problems.

If you haven’t set your goals yet, it’s a good idea to use a goal tracking app such as Aha! to do this and keep your aims in front of you at all times as well as check progress.

3. Target Audience

Creating a Brief for your WordPress Developer Target Audience
Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

The third section of your brief must contain the details about your target audience. If you haven’t researched this yet, then make sure to do it as soon as possible as this is a very important component of every successful project.

Describe such characteristics of your audience as its gender, age, occupation, location, interests, habits, and so on. Any relevant information will only be useful rather than a burden, so don’t be afraid to add something on top of that.

However, keep in mind that your audience may vary a lot and you may need to construct several customer personas. As long as you do this, you will be heading in the right direction with your project.

4. Detailed Project Description

This is the biggest section of your brief which goes into detail about every aspect of your project. Look back at your first section and elaborate on the points you made in it. You must be as precise and clear as possible. Otherwise, your developer won’t have a concrete picture of what you want and need.

If you don’t want to write your brief yourself, you can hire a professional from an online writing service such as Studicus to do this for you. Alternatively, you can ask only for this biggest part to be written for you and work on everything else yourself. If you decide to write your brief entirely on your own, make sure to check its grammar, spelling, and punctuation with the help of Grammarly.

5. Project Requirements

Right after the detailed project description, outline the project requirements. These include both functional and secondary requirements. Any tools, as well as resources, can also be added here in case you require those. Functional requirements are the ones that the project absolutely needs in order to be what you want it to be.

These include different features you want to be added and such. Secondary requirements are the ones that are not necessary right away and can be considered if there is enough time or resources for them. They serve as an additional advantage that your project may have in the future.

6. Timeline & Deadlines

Creating a Brief for your WordPress Developer Timeline and Deadlines
Photo by Alvaro Reyes on Unsplash

This section must include a timeline with all of the deadlines for your project. Even though you included a start and end date in the very first section of your brief, you must elaborate on it here and outline other dates. Make sure that you write about deadlines and timeframes for each stage of development. This will guarantee that the progress is steady and you can check back on how your developer is doing every once in a while.

Alternatively, you may want to ask your developer to report back on certain dates. You can also outline another timeline that can be used in case the first one fails due to an unexpected turn of events. This will work as a kind of a Plan B, so you don’t necessarily have to include it into the brief and can simply keep it for yourself.

7. Budget & Expenses

Creating a Brief for your WordPress Developer Budget and Expenses
Screenshot taken from Mint

The budget and expenses are always a sensitive topic for both sides. This is why you must treat this section with caution and make sure that all of the data you include here is as accurate as possible. Think of all the expenses you will have. If there are any additional ones that can happen out of the blue, describe them too as you wouldn’t want any surprises. You can use different apps such as Mint to help you keep track of your budget and manage your bank accounts at the same time.

8. Measures of Success

Creating a Brief for your WordPress Developer Measures of Success
Photo by Carlos Muza on Unsplash

The last section should include your measures of success. To put it simply, these are the standards that you will be comparing the result in order to check the project’s success. You must make them as realistic as possible, but not too high or too low at the same time.

You could say that these are similar to the second section of your brief where you mentioned your estimates. But unlike that section, this one should have more exact and concrete standards that you will stick to more seriously.

Final Thoughts on Creating a Brief for your WordPress Developer

In conclusion, writing a brief for your WordPress developer is definitely not as difficult once you know what it must include. Proper communication with your developer will ensure that both of you are aware of each other’s thoughts and intentions, so don’t hesitate to contact them if there is something you’d like to specify.

Create a scrollable tab like the WebFlow website using Jupiter X

Scrollable Tabs Post Featured Image

One way to provide visitors to your website with a seamless experience is through creating a scrollable parallax tab similar to the WebFlow.io homepage. Creating a scrollable parallax tab will allow users to access much of your site’s content as soon as they land on your homepage.

Many of our users asked about how to go about building a scrollable tab, and we’re here to answer! And what’s even better is that the Jupiter X theme has endless possibilities that can help you create a similar tab (as seen below) by using a simple trick. If you’re also curious about how you can build this amazing tab using Jupiter X, read this article to the end.

WebFlow sample scrollable tab.

What we need to create a scrollable tab:

  • Jupiter X Pro theme and its Elementor page builder
  • Jet Tricks from the Jupiter X bundled plugins
  • Raven, an exclusive Artbees plugin to extend the functionality of Elementor

First of all, allow me to briefly explain the whole process. We won’t use any tab elements to represent this. Instead, we’ll use the Raven Navigation Menu element and anchor links (#tab1, #tab2 …) as the tab titles. Then, we’ll use multiple sections that have the same ID as the anchor links (so when you click on the menu items, scroll to those sections).

And in the end, we’ll add the Sticky effect to the column container of the menu navigation element using the Jet Tricks plugin. Then, we’ll proceed to write a custom CSS snippet to add a transition to the menu items and make them bigger when they are active. Before starting, make sure you’ve already activated the above plugins from Jupiter X -> Control Panel -> plugins.

So, let’s start by building our menus. Navigate to Appearance -> Menus and create a new menu. Then add your Custom Link items. Remember to use the anchor links like #tab1, #tab2 … as the menu item link.

Add menu items with anchor link hashtags to be considered as Tab titles.

We are now done with this part of the process. Let’s create a page, and do the rest. From the Pages -> Add New, create a new page and start editing with Elementor.

Edit the page with Elementor.

In Elementor, drop a Section into your page, and divide it into two columns. Then drop a Navigation menu to your left column, and add a CSS class to the navigation menu.

Scrollable Tab Screenshot 3 - Add a CSS class to the menu in order to avoid conflict while wiring CSS snippets.
Add a CSS class to the menu in order to avoid conflict while wiring CSS snippets.

The next step is to add a custom CSS to make each menu stay in one line and also to enlarge them when they are active. So, from the page settings (bottom left corner of the page), choose the Advanced tab and then add the following CSS snippet in the Custom CSS section (JX).

/* Add Transition to the items */
.custom_tab_titles li a {transition: 0.2s all;}

/*make the items bigger when they are active while having transitions */
.custom_tab_titles li .raven-menu-item-active {transition: 0.2s all;
    transform: scale(1.3); margin-left: 0.8em;}
    
/* put each menu in one line */
.custom_tab_titles li {clear: both; display: block; width: 100%;}
Scrollable Tab Screenshot 4 - Add CSS snippet to make the menu items vertically aligned and add transition to them on mouse hover.
Add CSS snippet to make the menu items vertically aligned and add transition to them on mouse hover.

Now add some Inner Section elements to your other column. We need to assign an ID equivalent to the menu anchors in order to make them scrollable when clicked.

Scrollable Tab Screenshot 5 - Add a different ID to each inner section equivalent to each anchor link hashtag
Add a different ID to each inner section equivalent to each anchor link hashtag.

Add as much of your content as you want to your scrollable tabs. Here, I kept it empty in order to make it more understandable. I also added a min-height 400px to each inner section. You can avoid it or add more height. The styling part completely customizable, and you can do what you want with it.

The last step is selecting the Column container of the Navigation menu and adding the Sticky behavior to it.

Scrollable Tab Screenshot 6 -
Follow the steps in order to enable the sticky option for the navigation menu. It will be considered as the Tab titles later on.

I also added some typography settings and color changes to the navigation menu in order to make the scrollable tab more eye-catching. Take a look at what we have now:

Scrollable Tab Gif 2 - The scrollable tab made by Jupiter X and Elementor.
The scrollable tab made by Jupiter X and Elementor.

One of the great things about using Jupiter X to create a scrollable tab is that you have the flexibility to create a tab exactly to your liking. You have the option of adjusting the margins and paddings to fine tune the tab, as well as to style every corner of your new tab.

Additionally, you’re not limited by how many tabs you can have: you are free to add more and style them in any way you see fit. Don’t worry about getting carried away in adding too many new elements as this has been tested on all modern browsers, and it’s compatible with all of them.

In this blog post, we’ve provided you with the details on how to create a tailor-made scrollable parallax tab, similar to what can be seen on the WebFlow home. We also illustrated how to create this awesome tab with Jupiter X Pro (and the Elementor page builder), Jet Tricks and Raven.

Do not hesitate to ask any questions you may have in the comments below.

Different Ways to Add Custom Code Snippets in WordPress

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress Featured Image

Used by more than 60 million websites, WordPress is a popular, powerful and flexible Content Management System (CMS). One of WordPress’ valuable features is its extensibility architecture that allows users to expand WordPress features via plugins. In many cases, site owners need custom codes to improve the functionality of their website. In this way, custom code snippets plugins in WordPress can be a handy tool.

Sometimes when surfing the internet, we come across articles that explain how to add custom code snippets to the template files like index.php, footer.php or edit function.php files. These methods aren’t safe or recommended.

There are only two safe methods to add custom code snippets in WordPress:

  • Using plugins
  • Using the child theme

Adding Custom Code Snippets in WordPress Using Plugins

There are some plugins that allow you to add custom PHP, HTML, CSS and JavaScript codes in WordPress. In this article, we try to cover some of them with examples. Some of the plugins are listed below.

Insert the PHP Code Snippets Plugin

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Insert PHP Code Snippet

Using this plugin, we can add our PHP code conveniently to our pages, posts and widgets.

Features

  • Convert PHP snippets to shortcodes.
  • Insert PHP code easily using a shortcode.
  • Support for PHP snippet shortcodes in widgets.
  • Dropdown menu in TinyMCE editor to easily select snippet shortcodes.

Example

In this example, we want to display the number of content words in a post/page after a post or page.

1. After installing this plugin, click on PHPCode Snippet from the left sidebar of the admin page.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - PHP Code Snippets

2. On the new screen, click on the Add New PHP Code Snippet button.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - PHP Code Snippets 2

3. Set

  • Tracking Name: words-count
  • PHP code (this code displays the words count for a page or content post)
<?php

  function word_count() {
       $content = get_post_field( 'post_content', get_the_ID());
       $word_count = str_word_count( strip_tags( $content ) );
       return $word_count;
    }

  echo 'Words:', '  ' , word_count();

?>
Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - PHP Code Snippets 3

4. Click on the Create/Update button.

5. The plugin generates a shortcode as [xyz-ips snippet=”words-count”].

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - PHP Code Snippets 4

6. Go to Posts > Add New. At the end of the text, insert the above shortcode.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - PHP Code Snippets 5

7. After publishing the post, we can see the number of words in the post.

Insert the HTML Snippet Plugin

custom code snippets in WordPress - Insert HTML Snippet

Inserting the HTML Snippet allows us to create shortcodes corresponding to HTML snippets. We can create a shortcode corresponding to any random HTML code such as JavaScript codes, video embedding codes, CSS codes, among others and use the same in posts, pages or widgets.

Features

  • Convert HTML snippets to shortcodes.
  • Convert Javascript codes to shortcodes.
  • Convert CSS codes to shortcodes.
  • Support for snippet shortcodes in widgets.
  • Dropdown menu in TinyMCE editor to pick snippet shortcodes easily.
  • Insert Adsense or any add codes.
  • Insert flash, videos, etc. to your posts, pages, and widgets.

Example

In this example, we want to generate a Google Translate button after our post.

1. Install the plugin, and go to XYZ HTML > HTML Snippets.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - HTML Code Snippets 1

2. On the new screen, click on the Add new HTML Snippet button.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - HTML Code Snippets 2

3. Set

  • Tracking Name: translate
  • HTML Code (this code generates the Google Translate button)
<div id="google_translate_element"></div>

<script type="text/javascript">
function googleTranslateElementInit() {
  new google.translate.TranslateElement({pageLanguage: 'en'}, 'google_translate_element');
}
</script>

<script type="text/javascript" src="//translate.google.com/translate_a/element.js?cb=googleTranslateElementInit"></script>

4. Click on the Create button.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - HTML Code Snippets 3

5. The plugin will generate the shortcode as [xyz-ihs snippet=”translate”].

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - HTML Code Snippets 4

6. Go to Posts > Add New. Set the title and content the add [xyz-ihs snippet=”translate”] at the end of the post.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - HTML Code Snippets 5

7. Publish the post, and you will be able to see the Google Translate button after the post.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - HTML Code Snippets 6

Simple Custom CSS and JS Plugin

Custom code snippets in WordPress - Custom Css

Customizing your WordPress site’s appearance can easily be done by adding custom CSS and JS code without modifying the theme or plugin files.

Features

  • Text editor with syntax highlighting.
  • Print the code inline or include it into an external file.
  • Print the code in the header or the footer.
  • Add CSS or JS to the frontend or the admin side.
  • Add as many codes as you want.
  • Keep your changes when you change the theme.

Example

In this example, we want to change the background color of the admin bar with the CSS snippet.

1. Install the plugin and go to Custom CSS & JS > Add Custom CSS.

Custom Code Snippets - Custom CSS 1

2. On the new screen, in the options section, check the Internal, Header, In Admin radio button and set the following:

  • Title : admin-bar-background-color
  • Code (code change background color of admin bar in the admin page)
#wpadminbar {
    background-color: rebeccapurple;
}
Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Custom CSS 2

3. Click on the Publish button. You’ll be able to see that the admin bar background menu changed.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Custom CSS 3

Code Snippets Plugin

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin Banner

This is a powerful, simple and handy plugin that lets us add our PHP, HTML, CSS and JavaScript snippets to our websites.

Features

  • Providing a GUI interface.
  • Snippets can be activated and deactivated.
  • Categorize snippets with tags.
  • Snippets can be exported for transfer to another site.
  • Full-featured code editor.

Example #1

In this example, we want to disable standard widgets like Archives, Recent Posts, Recent Comments with the simple PHP snippet. The default page is similar to the image below:

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin 1

1. Install the plugin, and go to Snippets > Add New.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin 2

2. On the new screen, set:

  • Title: Remove standard widget
  • Code (Remove Archives, Recent Posts, Recent Comments from the right sidebar of the homepage).
function unregister_default_wp_widgets() { 

    unregister_widget('WP_Widget_Archives'); 
    unregister_widget('WP_Widget_Recent_Posts'); 
    unregister_widget('WP_Widget_Recent_Comments'); 
}

add_action( 'widgets_init', 'unregister_default_wp_widgets', 1 ); 

3. Save and activate the snippet.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin 3

4. After reloading the homepage, you’ll be able to see that the Archives, Recent Posts, Recent Comments have been removed.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin 4

Example #2

In this example, we want to change the font size of the post with the JavaScript code.

1. Go to Snippets > Add New.

2. Set

  • Title: change the font size
  • Code ( Increase the font size when clicking on the post text and decrease font size when holding down the SHIFT key and clicking.)
add_action( 'wp_head', function () { ?>

<script        src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js">    </script>

    <script>	
    $(document).ready(function(){
    $(".jupiterx-post-content").click(function(){
        if (event.shiftKey) {
            $(this).css({"font-size": "-=10%"});  
        } else {
            $(this).css({"font-size": "+=10%"});
        }
    });

  });

  </script>

<?php } );

3. Check the Only run on site front-end radio button and save it.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin 5

At the end, when clicking on the post text, the font size will have been changed.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Code Snippets Plugin 6

Adding Custom Code Snippets in WordPress Using Child Theme

In WordPress, a child theme is a sub-theme that inherits all the functionality, style and features from the parent theme. The child theme is a safe way to change or modify the parent theme without modifying parent theme files.

Example

Let’s add our default content to the WordPress editor.

Our default content: “This is some custom content. I’m adding it to the post editor because I hate re-typing it.”

1. Active the child theme on your site (for more information, read this article.)

2. Go to Appearance > Editor.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Child Theme 1

3. Open the functions.php file.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Child Theme 2

4. Add the below code at the end of functions.php, then update it.

add_filter( 'default_content', 'my_editor_content' ); 

  function my_editor_content( $content ) { 
    $content = "This is some custom content I'm adding to the post editor  because I hate re-typing it."; 
 
    return $content;
}
Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Child Theme 3

5. After modifying functions.php, go to Posts > Add New or Pages > Add New. You’ll be able to see that our default text has been added to the editor.

Custom Code Snippets in WordPress - Child Theme 4

Conclusion

In this article, we first introduced several plugins for adding custom code snippets in WordPress. We also included some examples on how to use HTML, CSS, JavaScript and PHP snippets using the plugins.

Finally, we showed how to add custom code snippets in WordPress with the child theme. Feel free to share your experience with us in the comments.

How to Do A/B Testing to Troubleshoot the Theme Issues with Jupiter X

A/B Testing Featured Image

What do you do when you face a problem using any of your tools? Some people stop using them entirely, while some try to fix it to avoid having to replace a perfectly good tool. But how do you fix something when you don’t know its mechanism? The answer is simple: Compare it with a fixed version of your tool and see which part is having the issue.

What is A/B testing?

This is how the so-called A/B testing technique can be used to troubleshoot an issue. It doesn’t matter if your tool is a tangible object, virtual machine, or software You can use this method to troubleshoot and solve the problems you encounter. You probably did it before without knowing that your using the A/B testing strategy, but let me give you some examples so you understand it better:

  • The moment that you decide to set up camp in the forest and pitch your tent, you are actually doing an A/B testing. You are always comparing between different locations and tents. Should I put my tent here or there? What will happen if I place it here? How do the other tents look? Are their campsites better than mine? You are pretty much using A/B testing at that moment to find and examine the best location available for your tent.
A/B Testing Tent
  • The moment that a laboratory scientist compares between normal and healthy samples to give you the results of your blood test, he/she is using A/B Testing.
A/B Testing Lab

The moment that you are in a clothing store and testing the clothes to see which one suits you better, you are doing an A/B Testing.

A/B Testing Clothes

There are dozens of other examples of the concept. You basically used this method a lot in your daily life to troubleshoot an issue.

In digital marketing, A/B Testing is the perfect method to measure the impression you make on your users and increase your sales by collecting and analyzing the statistics of different marketing campaigns.

Let’s see how we can use it to troubleshoot an issue with your website. The principle and method are the same. You need to compare your website with a perfect version of it or with the design you provided (PSD) to be able to detect the issues.

Notice: Always do your testings over a staging website and keep a full backup before starting your tests.

Provide the perfect look

The key point here is to have a perfect non-issue-ish version of your website. Whether it’s a PSD version or it’s a completed website, you need something to compare with your problematic website. Otherwise, detecting the issue will be hard. Keep the perfect look open on a different tab on your browser or in your Photoshop software. You will need it for the next steps.

If you had a website that was previously available but recently got issues and you don’t have a backup or screenshot from it, you may use Archive.org to see how your website looked like back then.

A/B Testing Perfect Look

Check the error logs

The first thing you should do is to use the browser Developer tools. Developer tools will help you detect the problems by providing debug tools and consoles. Hover the mouse on the different DOM elements in the Elements tab to see the size and details, and compare them with the other tab. It will help you detect the difference and then you will get one step closer to resolving the issue. Also, for the Javascript issues, you can compare the Browser Console tabs to see if you have any new errors in the problematic page or not.

A/B Testing Error Logs

Apply a change and compare again

This is a repeating task. You need to continuously compare the changes on your staging website and see if it helped or not. When I’m talking about the changes, I mean deactivating plugins one by one, switching the themes, updating WordPress (or other CMSes if you are using them), and even reconfigure your web host settings. Issues come from different places, so you need to perform the changes from different places to see if it’s related to your problem or not.

The thing is, the better you know the mechanism, the smarter you can troubleshoot an issue. For example, if a section background color is not working correctly, the reason cannot be from the webserver configuration (unless it’s a caching issue). Or when you have a server error on your page, it may not be related (or barely related) to the color configurations of your theme at all.

Sometimes, the issue goes further and comes from the Database or third-party API. So, you may need to reset your database and see if it helps or not. In a nutshell: You need to check everything that involves your website to be able to detect an issue.

Here is a list of things were common issues usually come from:

  • Web hosts and servers configurations. You should check the server requirements of your theme and plugins and make sure it meets the minimum requirements.
  • Outdated core CMS (WordPress), theme and plugins
  • Firewalls or security plugins.
  • Plugin conflicts, like multiple caching plugins which will conflict with each other
  • Misconfiguration of plugins, such as forcing SSL which should be done carefully
  • Misunderstanding or using the functions in an inappropriate way, like using a popup trigger on your burger menu icon (side note: Yes, it happened to some users already) which triggers weird popups as you trigger the menu
  • Customizing the codes, whether they are CSS or JS customizations, or even if it’s your child theme and you did change the theme files inside your child theme
  • Database corruptions or invalid data in the database

It’s better that you apply the changes you think may help, step by step, and see if they work.

Isolate the problem

While you are doing your A/B testing, you are also isolating the problem to the point that you find the reason for the issue and resolve it. When you find the problem, you did the job! The faster you isolate the problem, the sooner you get to the answer.

Here are some major testing tips which will help you get to the root of the issue faster:

  • Deactivate your plugins. If it did resolve the issue, you know that it’s a plugin conflict. Now, you have to activate the plugins one by one to see which one triggers the issue.
  • Switch the theme. Sometimes, a good starting point is to see if the issue is happening because of using your current theme or not. Switch to your parent theme if you are using a child theme, and switch to another theme if you don’t have a child theme. In case the issue resolves itself, you at least know that it’s coming from your theme.
  • Switch to another web host. Sometimes, it’s faster to move your whole website to another web server and see if you still see the issue. It’s especially good for when you have permission or caching issues. If your issue was resolved by moving your website to a new web host, then the problem is your previous web hosting service.
  • Change your browser, device or network. It happens sometimes that your browser, device, or even your ISP causes issues. Also, it’s better to deactivate your browser extensions as much as you can because some extensions such AdBlockers may cause some conflicts with parts of your website.

If none of the above helped, you can isolate more by removing the content from your pages or deactivating headers, footers and block sections. These will help you identify issues with your content if you had any.

Software and tools for A/B Testing

Although the best tools to troubleshoot an issue are your personal computer, a browser, and developer tools, each issue requires its own tool or service. Imagine that your SEO rank has dropped and you want to find the issue. What tools would you need? Probably, you will need your Google Search Console, or Alexa and Google Analytics.

Furthermore, each issue requires its own debugging tools. There are plenty of software and services, free and premium, which can help you troubleshoot an issue and also help you do automatic testing.

Here, I listed some of them:

  • BrowserStack Automate. It gives access to 2000+ real mobile devices and browsers, which include real iOS and Android devices, Chrome, IE, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. You can set a bunch of automatic testing tasks with different conditions and get results by Text Logs, Selenium/Appium Logs, Video Recordings, Screenshots, Console Logs, Network Logs, and more.
  • Screener.io. Although this is a good tool for automated testing, it’s Screen Overview function is also a great tool to find differences between two versions of your page.
  • WinMerge.org. It’s a diff checker tool that will allow you to find the difference between two versions of texts. You can use this to spot the differences between page contents, page sources, and even images!
  • GTMetrix.com is a performance analyzer. Open two tabs of the same website and apply your changes to your website. Then, retest on one of the tabs and do your performance A/B testing with it.
  • WordPress logger, debug and troubleshooting tools such as Debug Bar and its Add-ons. They can be considered as A/B testing debug tools as they provide a set of logs. You can then observe them and compare with different scenarios while doing your A/B testing in order to isolate and find the issue.

Conclusion

As mentioned, A/B testing is a method that you are using a lot in your daily life. You can use it to troubleshoot your website issues, too. Every tool you are using to check your website and debug its issues can turn into an A/B testing tool. It’s just about the way you’re using your tools.